We are hiring - WordPress Developers: apply here

There’s no easy answer to how much a WordPress website costs to plan, design, build and optimise.

However, there are a lot of factors that will affect the final amount of investment needed to get your new site up and running.

Everything has a price tag, and it’s very much down to personal choice how much you want to ‘spend’ on something.

Websites are no different, except that a well planned and executed website should make you more money than it costs you, so it should be viewed as an investment rather than a cost.

TL;DR – jump to what we charge for WordPress sites

What do you want to get out of it?

This should be the primary question to answer when budgeting for a new website.

  • Do you want more enquiries for the sales team?
  • Do you need more online sales?
  • Do you want more sign-ups on your mailing list?
  • Do you want more people to call you after landing on your site?
  • Do you want more online bookings?

If you are looking to have a new website built or have an existing one improved, the main thing you want from doing so is more of something.

As a business, more of something usually means more leads.

For a charity, it might mean more donations.

For a blog, it might mean more traffic.

For an online store, it’s always more sales.

For an event, it’s more bookings.

We don’t often build new websites for clients that want less of something.

What does more look like to you?

It’s important to put some figures against this, even if they are guesses to start with.

  • We want our site to deliver 50 new business leads a month
  • We want donations to increase by 30%
  • We want to double the traffic to the site
  • We want to sell 20% more products
  • We want to grow online bookings by 10%

Having a plan for what you want your site to achieve means that you can start to work out just how much to invest in it.

Ready to get a proposal?

So, what should you invest in your site?

Just do the math.

  • If a new client is worth £1000 to your business and you convert 10% of your leads to clients, an increase of 100 leads per month would be worth £10,000 per month (£120,000 per year)
  • If a website currently generates £5000 in donations per month, a 30% increase would generate £1500 more donations per month (£18,000 per year)
  • Your site could be making £500 per month in ads revenue from 5000 visits; 10,000 visits would increase that revenue to £1000 per month (£12,000 per year)
  • Selling £10,000 a month currently? A 20% increase in that would be an extra £2,000 a month (£24,000 per year)
  • Increasing your bookings from 50 to 55 (10%) at £500 per booking generates an additional £2500 per month (£30,000 per year)

Obviously, the above are just examples, and there are other things to factor in, but take the smallest increase – £12,000 per year…

What would you invest to get a return of £12,000? Not just this year, but next year and the year after…

This type of thinking often helps our clients that are unsure about what they need to invest in their websites.

If I tell you my budget, the website will just cost me my budget.

Yes and no.

A budget will allow us to tell you the best way to get you to where you want to be within the budget.

This is not always ploughing it into a website, it might be a combination of things like:

  • Investing 50% of it in the web design and build process and the remaining 50% on SEO and post-live optimisation
  • Building a smaller, niche website and then investing more in Google Ads
  • Using 80% of it on the website project and then the remaining 20% on two years of technical support and kick-ass hosting
  • Actually, using 100% of it on the site as complex functionality is required…

How your budget is carved up should be based on the results you want from your website, not blindly spent just creating the site.

Other stuff that affects the ‘cost’ of a WordPress site.

Along with what’s been outlined above, there are other technical and design elements that factor into what you need to invest in a WordPress project.

These will typically include:

  • The size of the site (number of pages)
  • The number of bespoke templates required across the site
  • The functional requirements (within the WordPress ecosystem of plugins)
  • Additional bespoke functionality (custom code, APIs, third-party integrations etc)
  • WooCommerce (the awesome WordPress eCommerce plugin)
  • Design and creative
  • Timescales
  • The size of your business
  • The number of people working on the project
  • And so on

All these things are factored into the investment required to build an effective and hard-working WordPress website.

Get a quote for your new website

What we charge for WordPress website projects.

Here at Toast, we work with a wide range of clients, from bloggers to sole traders and large corporates alike.

How we charge for websites is simple.

We let you know what we can achieve within your budget.

We have our own bespoke WordPress theme and this enables us to deploy sites efficiently.

We work on projects from £1,000 to £20,000, so what we quote you for your site will be within that range and dependant on what we’ve talked about above.

The best thing to do is just give us a call on 01295 266644 if you want to discuss a project or just pick our brains about website budgets. We won’t set the sales team on you, we don’t have one.

 

The better the brief, the better the proposal.

We often get asked to provide ball-park or guestimate quotes for projects.

If you ask us for one of these, we are likely to be 20-30% more than we would be if you supply a full brief.

We have a simple rule that prospective clients do one of the following:

  1. Send us your own brief or RFP that fully outlines the scope of the project
  2. Complete our website briefing form here.

Without one of the above, the best thing we can offer you in terms of charges for a project is a ‘best guess’.

Ready to get started?

If you would like to get a proposal for your new website, fixing up a broken site or migrating your old site to the WordPress CMS, get started here:

Send us your brief here

Top